Glayva

Almond Day

Feb 16

Other Scottish Country Dances for this Day

Almond Day
Glayva
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Today's Musings, History & Folklore

"Aged Scotch whiskies, secret spices, Mediterranean tangerines, cinnamon, almonds and honey ... Glayva!"

According to the liqueur legend, Glayva was first produced in 1947 by wine and whisky merchant Ronald Morrison who wanted to create a liqueur that would warm and comfort.  Upon tasting the liquid for the first time, Hector, the warehouseman declared that it was ‘Gle Mhath” Gaelic for "very good."  From that point on the liqueur was named Glayva.

Glayva

The almond is native to the Mediterranean climate region of the Middle East and was spread by humans in ancient times into northern Africa and southern Europe, and more recently transported to other parts of the world, notably California, United States.

 

The wild form of domesticated almond still grows in parts of eastern Mediterranean.

 

The fruit of the wild forms contains the glycoside amygdalin, which becomes transformed into deadly prussic acid (hydrogen cyanide) after crushing, chewing, or any other injury to the seed. A key indicator of cyanide poisoning is the faint smell of roasted almonds on the victim, as illustrated in many early mystery novels.

 

Selection of the sweet type, from the many bitter types in wild, marked the beginning of almond domestication. 

***

Almond flavoring is a component of "Glayva," a blend of aged Scotch whiskies, a selected range of spices, Mediterranean tangerines, cinnamon, almonds and honey. 

 

According to the liqueur legend, Glayva was first produced in 1947 created by wine and whisky merchant Ronald Morrison who wanted to create a liqueur that would warm and comfort.  Upon tasting the liquid for the first time, Hector, the warehouseman declared that it was ‘Gle Mhath” Gaelic for "very good."  From that point on the liqueur was named Glayva.

 

For the dance performed by the Tay Dancers see below.

 

Glayva is just one of the many special Scottish whiskies and liqueur Scottish Country dances.   To see more dances with spirits themes, click the vintage Glava advertisement or click here.

Glayva
Glayva

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The majority of dance descriptions referenced on this site have been taken from the

 

Scottish Country Dancing Dictionary or the

Scottish Country Dancing Database 

 

Snapshots of dance descriptions are provided as an overview only.  As updates may have occurred, please click the dance description to be forwarded to a printable dance description or one of the official reference sources.

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