Candy & Sweets

 
There are an incredible number of dances with candy and sweet themes.   A whole program could be created just for chocolate!  A jig, reel, or strathspey for every sweet tooth.
 
 

Selected Dances

(click for more food history and folkore and background information)

Butterscotch and Honey

Butterscotch Pudding Day

Do you know difference between butterscotch, caramel, toffee, and dulce de leche?

Butterscotch and Honey

Double Fudge

Fudge and Tablet Day

Fudge is a type of sugar candy (often chocolately) made by mixing sugar, butter and milk, heating it to the soft-ball stage, then beating the mixture while it cools so that it acquires a smooth, creamy consistency. Tablet is fudge's Scottish cousin with a more brittle and grainy texture. American style fudge became popular in the United States as a shared recipe enjoyed by the ladies at Vassar College during the late 1880s. However, the slang term "fudge" (which as a noun means lies or nonsense) predates the candy and even appears in Sir Walter Scott's St. Ronan's Well (1823) as "'He lies,' answered Lord Etherington, 'so far as he pretends I know of such papers. I consider the whole story as froth - foam, fudge, or whatever is most unsubstantial.'"

Double Fudge

Mint Truffles

Chocolate Mint Day

Truffles originated in France in 1895 or 1920, depending on various sources, as a ball of chocolate ganache dusted with cocoa and was given the name truffle for their resemblance to the dark and rumpled prized mushrooms of the same name. Besides the classic French truffle, there are now regional variations such as Swiss truffles, European truffles, American Truffles, California Truffles, and even Cannabis truffles! But mint is always nice!

Mint Truffles

Sugar Candie

Gumdrop Day

In 1915 a candy manufacturer named Percy Truesdell started producing a gumdrop with an enhanced texture, using a formula he developed while conducting experiments at Ohio State University. Truesdell came to be known as "the gumdrop king" and was credited with inventing the modern soft gumdrop, though this term and candy form had been around since the late 19th century. If you ever played the classic board game, Candy Land, you will remember Gumdrop Mountain!

Sugar Candie

The Chocolate Factory

Willy Wonka Day

The Chocolate Factory

Walnut Cake with Chocolate Spread

Chocolate Cake Day

Walnut Cake with Chocolate Spread

Candy Floss

Cotton Candy Day

Candy Floss

Maple Sugar Jig

Maple Syrup Day

Time for pancakes and waffles or some maple sugar candy! Maple syrup was first collected and used by the indigenous peoples of North America, who reduced the sugary water by freezing it and discarding the ice or boiling off the water to make maple sugar. Today the Sugar Maple Pie is a seasonal specialty dessert, traditionally enjoyed in the largest syrup producing areas in Canada, Quebec, and the Northeastern United States, Vermont, who are biggest producers of maple syrup in their respective countries. Recipe included: Sugar Maple Pie

Maple Sugar Jig

Peter Hastings' Chocolate Mousse

Chocolate Mousse Day

Alexandre Viard, chef to Louis XVI and Napoleon, first described this dessert, later referred to as "mousse au chocolat" in the 1820 edition of his culinary encyclopedia, Le Cuisinier Royal. But the popularity of this tasty chocolate dessert really began to surge when the French artist Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864-1901), who was also known for his culinary skills, came up with a recipe he first named “mayonnaise au chocolat.” Peter Hastings' actual recipe included!

Peter Hastings' Chocolate Mousse

Swiss Chocolate

World Chocolate Day

Switzerland is particularly renowned for its chocolate, especially its milk chocolate. In 1875, a Swiss confectioner, Daniel Peter, developed the first solid milk chocolate using condensed milk, which had been invented by Henri Nestlé, who was Peter's neighbour in Vevey. A few years after in 1879, Rodolphe Lindt perfected the conching machine (a special chocolate polisher, mixer and agitator which improves the quality, texture, and flavor) after a happy accident which left one of his mixing machine on overnight, yielding a flavorful smooth mixture which ultimately allowed chocolate to be utilized in confectionery, rather than just as a gritty hot beverage flavouring. Prior to that, the gritty solid chocolate was not popular!

Swiss Chocolate

The Honeycomb

Honey Day

The hexagonal comb of the honey bee has been admired and wondered about from ancient times. The geometry of a honeycomb minimizes the amount of used material and allows the storage of the maximum amount of honey. Honeycomb candy, also known as cinder coffee, is a popular, easy-to-make treat which mimics the airy texture of real honeycomb - sugar, honey, cornstarch, and baking soda!

The Honeycomb

Cotton Candy

Cotton Candy Day

What Americans call cotton candy is called “candyfloss” in the UK and India, “fairy floss” in Australia and Finland, “papa’s beard” (barbe à papa) in France, and “old ladies’ hair” in Greece!

Cotton Candy

Milk Chocolate with Allemandes

M & M's Day

Milk Chocolate with Allemandes

Ribbon Candy

Hard Candy Day

Whether it's marzipan, maple sugar candy, chocolate Santas, candy canes, or hard ribbon candy, there is much to delight the eye and plenty of selections for decorating gingerbread or candy houses! Although first made by confectioners by modeling the wavy form around the candy maker’s thumb, by the 1800s mechanical crimpers were invented to shape the ribbons of ribbon candy that we know today.

Ribbon Candy

The Candy Cane Reel

St. Nicholas' Day

The candy cane allegedly owes Its distinctive shape to a 17th century German choirmaster, who bent the a hard candy into the form of a shepherd’s staff and gave it to children to symbolize the image of Jesus, the Good Shepherd.  As shepherd of his people and patron saint of children, images of St. Nicholas often include a hook-shaped staff called a crozier. Traditional treats for the Feast of St. Nicholas include apples, oranges, nuts, candy canes, and St. Nicholas cookies, a popular holiday spiced cookie with similar flavors to gingerbread but without the molasses.

The Candy Cane Reel

The Lightnin' Bug

Firefly Day

Fireflies, which are not flies but beetles, produce flashes of light in order to communicate with each other and to attract mates. They produce a cold light through a chemical reaction known as bioluminescence. Adult fireflies aren’t the only ones that glow. In some species, the larvae and even the eggs emit light. Each species has its own unique flashing pattern, but only two places in the world have synchronous flashing (called "simultaneous bioluminescence"), where the fireflies flash in unison - southeast Asia and the Great Smoky Mountains National Park in Tennessee. The color of light emitted by the luceferin molecule in fireflies can range from red to yellow to green. But for just two to four weeks a year, "Blue Ghost" fireflies make an appearance around Asheville, North Carolina. Their bluish light is actually a green, but perceived as blue because of the tendency for the peak luminance sensitivity of the eye to shift toward the blue end of the color spectrum at low illumination levels as part of dark adaptation. Flash! Flash!

The Lightnin' Bug

Candy & Sweets Dance Index

(click for dance description or cribs)

Chocolate Dance Index

(click for dance description or cribs)

Jan    Feb    Mar    Apr    May    Jun    Jul    Aug    Sep    Oct    Nov    Dec

The majority of dance descriptions referenced on this site have been taken from the

 

Scottish Country Dancing Dictionary or the

Scottish Country Dancing Database 

 

Snapshots of dance descriptions are provided as an overview only.  As updates may have occurred, please click the dance description to be forwarded to a printable dance description or one of the official reference sources.

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