Picnic & Potlucks

Something for everyone!  Why not organize a dance on the green?   Or have everyone bring a potluck dish based on one of the dances.   There are "main course" dances that could be assigned to the confident cooks, "appetizer" and "side dish" dances for something lighter, "dessert" dances for those with a sweet-tooth, and "condiment" or "fresh fruit" dances for those in a hurry.  
 
 

Selected Dances

(click for more holiday folklore and background information)

Walnut Pie

Walnut Pie

Pie Day

The word "walnut" comes from the old English “walh-hnuts,” meaning foreign nut. Today this species is generally referred to as the English walnut. The black walnut, native to North America, does not have as pleasant a taste when eaten raw and is more bitter; however, it does retains more of its flavor when cooked. Early English settlers in the American Colonies had to depend on the native black walnut because imported English walnut trees did not adapt easily. On the west coast of the US, however, the Franciscan fathers also brought walnut trees to California in the early 1700s from Mexico. Through their efforts, walnut trees were planted in the courtyards of the California missions, where they flourished. The Grizzly Bear pie, a walnut pie variation made with with walnuts and honey, is a delicious nod to California's historic roots. Recipes included! 🥧 🐻 🍯 🌰

The Sour Lemon (Lemon Chiffon Cake)

The Sour Lemon (Lemon Chiffon Cake)

Lemon Chiffon Cake Day

The fluffy chiffon cake is a classic mid-century modern cake style credited to a California insurance salesman turned caterer, who sold his fluffy cake secret to General Mills who then released recipes to the public in a Betty Crocker pamphlet in 1948. Chiffon cakes are made by substituting oil for butterfat and aerating the cake by whipping egg whites separately from the yolks and then folding this into the batter to produce a delicate light texture. Of course, if life gives you lemons, you can always make a whisky sour too :-) Recipe included! 🍋🍰

The Muffin Lady

The Muffin Lady

Muffin Day

Do you like muffins with your tea? In the United States, muffins are similar to cupcakes and are available in sweet and savoury varieties. While in the UK, a muffin (referred to as an English muffin elsewhere) is a type of yeast-leavened bread and is cooked on a griddle and flipped, resulting in the flattened shape. Other muffin-like variations such as crumpets (griddle cooked on one side from a simple batter with no yeast) are equally delicious and join the group of tea-time treats whose names also figure prominently as terms of endearment or even cheeky admiration! Pass the butter! 🧈

Dreamcatcher

Dreamcatcher

Native American Day

Dream catchers can be traced back to the Ojibwe (Chippewa) tribes who inhabited the regions of southern Canada and the northern Midwestern United States. In the Ojibwe culture, dreamcatchers were "spider web charms", hoops with woven string or sinew meant to replicate a spider's web, used as a protective charm for infants. According to Ojibwe legend, the protective charms originate with the Spider Woman, known as Asibikaashi; who takes care of the children and the people on the land. As the Ojibwe Nation spread to the corners of North America it became difficult for Asibikaashi to reach all the children, so the mothers and grandmothers wove webs for the children, which had a protective purpose and were not originally connected with dreams.

Spaghetti Junction

Spaghetti Junction

Spaghetti Day

The Nutcracker

The Nutcracker

Sugar Plum Day

Tchaikovsky's famous Christmas-themed ballet, "The Nutcracker" debuted on Dec. 18, 1892 in St. Petersburg, Russia. Initially unsuccessful, it has now become a global Christmas tradition and an annual opportunity at ballet studios for aspiring ballerinas all over the world. Many highland dance studios and even traditional ballet companies also celebrate the season with their own Scottish Dance themed Nutcracker performances or with a kilt or two appearing in one or more scenes! One of the most anticipated dances of the ballet, the " Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy" occurs in the third movement, set in the Land of Sweets, and is distinguished for its memorable use of the celesta, a piano-like instrument that sounds like the tinkling of bells! 🌰 🎄 🎁 🩰

Bannocks and Brose

Bannocks and Brose

Pancake Day

Toss those pancakes, oatcakes, soda scones, drop scones, crumpets or bannocks, folks ... It's Pancake Day! Shrove Tuesday (Pancake Day or Pancake Tuesday) is known in Scotland as Bannock Night, and is a moveable feast day preceding Ash Wednesday (the first day of Lent), which is often celebrated by consuming pancakes and griddle cakes! Shrove Tuesday was the last opportunity to use up eggs and fats before embarking on the Lenten fast, and pancakes or bannocks were the perfect way of using up these ingredients. The Scots version of Lenten bannocks, is made with oatmeal, eggs, milk or beef stock and cooked on a girdle (griddle). Milk-brose or gruel was often served to eat with the bannocks, leading to this evening also being referred to as Brose Day (Brosie), or Milk-Gruel Night! Some older customs on Bannock Night involve dritual pouring of batter - one person would pour the batter onto the griddle, another turned the pancake and a third removed them when they were ready, handing them round the assembled company. When the bowl of batter was almost empty, a small quantity of soot was aded to the mixture to make the large sooty bannock, also known as the dreaming bannock. The sooty bannock would fill the whole girdle and symbolic charms could be dropped into it: button (bachelor); a ring (married); thimble (old maid); farthing (widow); scrap of material (tailor); straw (farmer). Once the bannock was turned and cooked through, it was cut into bits and put into the baker's apron for everyone to draw a piece with their fortune. At the end of the evening, a piece of the sooty bannock would be put inside a sock and placed under pillows where the dreamer hoped to dream of their future partner! 🥞

Fish and Chips Reel

Fish and Chips Reel

Fish and Chips Day

A classic takeaway food, fish and chips first gained popularity in England in the 1860s and quickly became a stable food in English-speaking and Commonwealth countries. Regional variations differ mostly in the fish used and the accompaniments (malt vinegar, brown sauce, mushy peas, pickles, tartar sauce, or even baked beans or curry sauce). In Australia and New Zealand, the words "fish and chips" are often used as a shibboleth to highlight the difference in each country's short-i vowel sound. Australian English has a higher forward sound close to the ee in see (but shorter), while New Zealand English has a lower backward sound akin to the a in Rosa's (but not as in Rosa). Thus, New Zealanders hear Australians say "feesh and cheeps," while Australians hear New Zealanders say "fush and chups." 🐟 🍟 🥔

Whortleberry

Whortleberry

Bilberry Sunday

Huckleberry dancing friends, will you collect bilberries on Bilberry Sunday? Bilberry Sunday is a day traditionally set aside during the festival of Lughnasadh (to mark the beginning of the harvest season) to gather bilberries. Related to the blueberry, this fruit is known by a spectacularly long list of names: wimberry, whinberry, winberry, windberry, bilberry, fraughan, hurtleberry, whortleberry, blaeberry, black-heart (famously mentioned in Thomas Hardy's novel, "The Return of the Native") and myrtle berry! Generally speaking, the Welsh call them wimberries, the Irish call them fraughans, the English say bilberries, and the Scots use the word blaeberry, although there are many derivations of the word and regional differences. In the USA, for example, they can be known as huckleberries, a derivation of the word hurtleberry, used by English settlers in the 17th century. Interested in a post-dance recipe for a "Huckleberry Hurtleberry Whortleberry Bilberry" cobbler made with almond flour? Grab your bilberry bucket! 🫐🪣

Key Lime Pie

Key Lime Pie

Key Lime Pie Day

Unlike apple pie (the first recipe of which hails from Chaucer-era England) , Key Lime Pie is a uniquely American dessert. This pie is considered the official pie of the Florida Key (although ironically, the majority of Key Lime trees introduced by the Spanish in the 1500s were wiped out during the hurricane of 1926 and replaced by Persian Limes)! At any rate, recipes for Key Lime Pie were not recorded until the 1930s. At this time, fresh milk, refrigeration, and ice where not available in the Keys until the arrival of tank trucks with the opening of the Overseas Highway in 1930. Because of this lack of milk, local cooks relied on canned sweetened condensed milk, a key ingredient which makes this pie so smooth and delicious. Recipe included: Key Lime Bars!

The Strathspey Sandwich

The Strathspey Sandwich

Sandwich Day

The sandwich as we know it was popularized in England in 1762 by John Montagu, the 4th Earl of Sandwich. whose substantial gambling problem required him to spend hours on end at the card table. During one particularly long binge, he asked the house cook to bring him something he could eat without getting up from his seat, and the modern sandwich was born! By the Revolutionary War, the sandwich had become popular and well established in England, but did not appear as an entry in an American cookbook until 1815. Despite its aristocratic origins, the social credit of sandwiches has waxed and waned, from an elegant ladies' luncheon offering in the 1890s to the standard fare of a working man's lunchbox in the 1920s. And if the amount of bread used wasn't controversial enough, there are ongoing sandwich wars in the food industry! While the dictionary defines sandwich as a "an item of food consisting of two pieces of bread with meat, cheese, or other filling between them," when it comes to regions and taxation, this definition becomes problematic. In California, a hot dog is officially considered a sandwich, while in Massachusetts, a burrito is definitely NOT a sandwich, although it is a "sandwich-like product." And in New York, certain sandwiches are taxable while others are not. Open-face sandwiches, anyone? 🥪

Victoria Plums

Victoria Plums

Sugar Plum Day

Originally referring to a confit or sweetmeats shaped as plums, the term "sugar plum" acquired new meaning past the 1600s. If your mouth was "full of sugar plums," it meant that you spoke sweet (but possibly deceitful) words. If you "stuffed another's mouth with sugar plums," that referred to a sop or bribe that would shut someone up. Nowadays, the term plum is still used to refer to an especially desirable thing, such as a prize, or a choice job or appointment.

Mr Pye's Steak and Kidney Pie

Mr Pye's Steak and Kidney Pie

British Pie Week

By medieval times, pies with sides and lids of crust, called "coffyns" were often baked with a removable lid, allowing for various food fillings for the common folk and surprising and exotic contents for royalty. It is said that not only were live birds concealed into pies, but rabbits, frogs, dogs, dwarves (who would pop out and recite poetry) and even a whole musical ensemble! Steak and Kidney Pie, a quintessentially British dish is referred to in rhyming slang as Kate and Sidney pie, snake and kiddy pie, and snake and pygmy pie! 🥧

Teddy Bear's Picnic

Teddy Bear's Picnic

Teddy Bear Picnic Day

Today is a fine day to host a Teddy Bears' Picnic for young ones of your acquaintance, inviting all well-behaved Teddy Bears and other stuffed animals. In real life, however, it's wise to take all due care to prevent frolicking and hungry bears from crashing your own picnic party or camping trip. Real bears will go to great lengths to sample food left accessible by humans both outdoors and and can even rip open cars and break into houses if determined . Sometimes, though, all they want is a cool beverage. In 2012, a family of bears ransacked a cabin in northern Norway and guzzled 100 cans of beer! In a similar event in 2004, a bear drank 36 cans of Rainier, but completely ignored the Busch beer. After sleeping off his hangover, the bear was captured in a trap baited with doughnuts, honey, and two more cans of his favorite lager! 🍩 🐻 🧸 🍯 🍉 🍺

The Sour Lemon

The Sour Lemon

Lemon Meringue Pie Day

Lemon flavored custards, puddings and pies have been enjoyed since Medieval times. Meringue was perfected in the 17th century, and lemon meringue pie, as it is known today, is a 19th-century product, first recorded by Alexander Frehse, a Swiss baker from Romandie. Or if the perfect meringue eludes you and you're looking for a more practical use of your sour lemons, with nothing but a lemon, copper clips, zinc nails, wire, and some steel wool, you can start a survival campfire in the wilderness through the magic electrochemistry! 🍋 🥧

Lobster in the Pot

Lobster in the Pot

Lobster Day

Ladies, who knew? Get the clarified butter! Lord Byron's opinions notwithstanding, while today considered an expensive delicacy, lobster was once considered a poor man's food, to be fed only to animals, prisoners, and indentured servants! Things reversed in the 19th century, when elegant lobster dishes, such as Lobster Thermidor and Lobster Newberg became popular amongst the elite. 🦞

Meyer Lemon Strathspey

Meyer Lemon Strathspey

Lemon Dessert Day

Meyer lemons are not impossible to eat, they are quite delightful! A former decorative houseplant and backyard ornamental, the Meyer lemon, is a sweeter and juicier cross between a lemon and a mandarin orange. These lemons only became popular after being featured by chef Martha Stewart in her 1980s recipes: lemon-pine nut tart, whole-wheat spaghetti with Meyer lemon, arugula and pistachios, coffee cake with thinly sliced Meyer lemons in the batter. Prior to that, these lemons had not been popular with growers because their thin skin made them difficult to ship long distances. Recipe included: Martha Stewart's Meyer Lemon Shortbread Wreaths with Rosemary 🍋🍋🍋

Invitation to a Picnic Index of Dances

(click for dance description or cribs)

Dance
Type
Couples
Devisor
Source
Link Notes
Burnhervie Picnic
Coming Soon
Picnic Invitation
Jig
2C
Breest
Coming Soon
Picnic On The Grass
Strathspey
3C/4C
Bowlen
East Ivanhoe 2
Coming Soon
Picnic in the Rain
Reel
RC
Clar
The Corberry Collection
Coming Soon
Pink Panda's Picnic
Jig
4C
Kobayashi
Kobb's New Cherry Blossom Dances
Rose Garden Picnic
Jig
3C/4C
Springer
Step Tighter
Coming Soon
Teddybear's Picnic
Jig
4C
Leyffer
Teddybear's Picnic
Jig
4C
Collin
Ardbrae 50 Years

A Basket Full of Brunch & Breakfast Index of Dances

(click for dance description or cribs)

Dance
Type
Couples
Devisor
Source
Link Notes
Bannocks and Brose
Jig
3C/4C
Holden
Birmingham 20 SCD 2004
Bannocks and Brose
Jig
3C/4C
Holden
Birmingham 20 SCD 2004
Bannocks o' Barley
Reel
3C/4C
Attwood
Alexander 2
Coming Soon
Bannocks o' Barley
Reel
3C/4C
Attwood
Alexander 2
Coming Soon
Christine's Bannocks
Reel
3C/4C
Gibson
Green Ginger
Strathspey
3C/4C
Dix
Reel Friends 3
Meyer Lemon Strathspey
Strathspey
2C/3C
Hallenbeck
Houston & District 30th
Mixed Nuts
Jig
2C
Dennis Mae
I Have This Dance
Oranges and Lemons
Jig
3C/4C
Klann
A Few for More
Coming Soon
Sour Lemon
Jig
2C/4C
Ashby
Stirring the Porridge
Jig
3C/4C
Makinson
Canterbury
Coming Soon
Sweet Ginger
Strathspey
4C
Gray 1
Coming Soon
The Muffin Lady
Reel
3C/4C
Johnstone
Dookie Bookie
The Penultimate Banana
Medley
4C
Perkins &
New Forest 3
Coming Soon
The Porridge Bowl
Jig
4C
Rowe
Silver Jubilee 25
Coming Soon
The Porridge Drawer
Reel
3C
Boehmer
Cameo20
Coming Soon
The Rhubarb Reel
Jig
5C
Clark
The Corberry Collection
Victoria Plums
Strathspey
4C
Drewry
Whortleberry
Jig
4C
Metcalf
Los Angeles 25th

A Basket Full of the Savoury and the Sweet Index of Dances

(click for dance description or cribs)

Dance
Type
Couples
Devisor
Source
Link Notes
Bangers and Beans
Reel
3C/4C
McKinnell
Coming Soon
Bangers and Mash
Reel
3C/4C
Mitchell
Whetherly 23
Corn Chowder
Reel
3C/4C
Fuell
Flying Ghillies 4
Corn Chowder
Reel
3C/4C
Fuel
Flying Ghillies 4
Curry and Spice
Jig
3C/4C
Shunmugam
Sydney DownUnder
Fish and Chips
Jig
4C
Hamilton
Let's All Dance 2
Hot Chili
Jig
lines
Lataille
Still Enough to Dance
Coming Soon
Irish Stew
Reel
5C
Oppedijk
Coming Soon
Ismaning Cabbage
Jig
3C/4C
Halak
Munich Anniversary Book
Coming Soon
Little PIckle
Jig
3C/4C
Mitchell
Whetherly 14
Coming Soon
Lobster in the Pot
Jig
2C/4C
Clowes
Ormskirk Mem.
McBain's Beans
Reel
2C/4C
Dickson
Partners & Sets
Coming Soon
McBain's Beans
Reel
3C/4C
Mitchell
Whetherly 23
Coming Soon
Mr Pye's Steak and Kidney Pie
Jig
3C/4C
West
Mulligan Stew
Reel
3C/4C
Saint Armand
Let's All Dance 2
Coming Soon
Mulligan Stew
Reel
3C/4C
Saint Armand
Let's All Dance 2
Peanut Butter and Jelly
Jig
3C
Carr
Let's All Dance 2
Petit Suisse
Reel
4C
Dalkin & Wilcock
Stafford Book
Rice and Lefse
Jig
3C
Friedman-Shedlov
8 x 32
Sage and Salsa
Medley
3C
Lataille
Still Enough To Dance
Salt and Pepper
Reel
3C/4C
Sizer
Pinewoods 1
Coming Soon
Sandy's Scotch Broth
Strathspey
3C
Gail Sibley
Katannuta Book
Shepherd's Pie
Reel
3/4C
Coutts
Garioch
Coming Soon
Skate in Black Butter
Medley
4C
Gorman
New Forest SCD Book 2 [10]
Coming Soon
Spaghetti Junction
Medley
4C
Glover
Flowing Reels
Coming Soon
The Falmouth Oyster
Reel
3C
Truswell
30th Anniversary Dances [4]
Coming Soon
The Kale Pot
Strathspey
3C/4C
Boyd
SDA
null
The Missed Steak
Jig
3C/4C
de Vroome
Friends 4
The Sandwich Man
Jig
4C
Forbes
Craigievar 5
Coming Soon
The Spaghetti Reel
Reel
3C/4C
Young
Winchester Diamond Jub 2012
Coming Soon
The Strathspey Sandwich
Medley
Medley
Bardill & company
Diamond Set
Walnut Pie
Strathspey
5C
Dejean
The Walnut Book

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