St. Patrick's Day

Celebrate  St. Patrick's Day or the wearin' of the green any day with Scottish Country Dances!

 
Get your kilt on!  Get your Celt on!  

Selected Dances

(click for more Irish folklore and background information)

Irish Coffee (coffee, cream, sugar, and spirits) became popular in the 19th century coffee houses. Today, Bailey's Irish Cream, introduced in 1974, can provide you with all of these components (with the addition of chocolate, vanilla, and burnt sugar)! As is the case with milk, Bailey's Irish Cream will curdle whenever it comes into contact with a weak acid. However, some cocktails call for just that! The Cement Mixer, a shot of Bailey's mixed with lime juice, is sometimes on the list of worst ever cocktails. The drink is traditionally ingested by taking the shot of Bailey's, holding it in the mouth, then sipping the lime juice and mixing both liquids either by swirling them around in the mouth or shaking the head. Who knew? Curdled or not, Sláinte!

Bailey's Irish Cream

St. Patrick's Season

Today, the jig dance and musical form is most associated with Irish dance music, Scottish Country Dance and the Métis people in Canada. Jigs were originally in duple compound meter, (e.g., 12/8 time), but have been adapted to a variety of time signatures, by which they are often classified into groups, including light jigs, slip jigs, single jigs, double jigs, and treble jigs!

St Patrick's Day Jig

St. Patrick's Day

Shamrocks are everywhere during this season, even in your pint of Guinness! The St Patrick's Day custom of "drowning the shamrock" or "wetting the shamrock" is still popular, especially in Ireland. A shamrock is put into the bottom of a cup, filled with whiskey, beer, or cider, then drunk as a toast to St Patrick, Ireland, and those present. The shamrock may either be swallowed with the drink or taken out and tossed over the shoulder for good luck.

The Shamrock Girl

St. Patrick's Day

Luck of the Irish Dance Index

(click for dance description or cribs)

Jan    Feb    Mar    Apr    May    Jun    Jul    Aug    Sep    Oct    Nov    Dec

The majority of dance descriptions referenced on this site have been taken from the

 

Scottish Country Dancing Dictionary or the

Scottish Country Dancing Database 

 

Snapshots of dance descriptions are provided as an overview only.  As updates may have occurred, please click the dance description to be forwarded to a printable dance description or one of the official reference sources.

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