The Scots Kitchen

 
Traditional foods for  holidays and every day.  See what's inside the Scottish Country Dance "Cookbook" and perhaps make or "dance" one of these recipes today!

Selected Dances

(click for more holiday folklore and background information)

Helen's Shortbread

Helen's Shortbread

Shortbread Day

Shortbread originated in Scotland, with the first printed recipe appearing in 1736, from a Scotswoman named Mrs. McLintock. Shortbread was so popular, early Scottish bakers fought to prevent shortbread from being classified as a biscuit to avoid paying a government biscuit tax! Do you have a family or favourite shortbread recipe with just the right proportions of butter, sugar, and flour (and maybe some salt to enhance the flavour)? Or maybe you fancy the occasional addition of chai, rosemary, lemon, or chocolate - flavours compatible with a sweet biscuit. Some recent shortbread trends may not be for everyone. One trendy addition is adding the flavour of Katsuobushi, a smoked, aged and dried skipjack tuna, which gives an unusual umami character! Hmmm ... you have to draw a line in the flour somewhere. Although we have not found the namesake recipe referenced by the dance, included are traditional regional variations such as: Pitcaithly Bannock (almonds, caraway seeds, crystallized orange) and Yetholm Bannock (chopped ginger)! 🧈

The Foula Reel

The Foula Reel

Bird Day

The island of Foula, part of the Shetland archipelago of islands, is one of the United Kingdom’s most remote permanently inhabited islands and named from the Old Norse Fugla-ey, meaning "Bird island." Seabirds and moorland birds, including 'Bonxies' – the Shetland dialect name for the Great Skua – as well as Puffins, Kittiwakes, Guillemots, Arctic terns, red-throated divers, Fulmars, amongst others, inhabit the sandstone cliffs and open moorland. Foula remained on the Julian calendar when the rest of the Kingdom of Great Britain adopted the Gregorian calendar in 1752, keeping 1800 as a leap year, but not observing leap year in 1900. As a result, Foula is now one day ahead of the Julian calendar and 12 days behind the Gregorian, observing Christmas Day on the 6th of January and New Year's Day on the 13th! The traditional fishing grounds for fishermen from the isle of Papa Stour (lying roughly a mile off the west coast of Shetland) lay way off into the Atlantic. The fishermen would row west to the point where the cliffs of Foula would disappear into the horizon . This was "Rowing Foula down." 🦅 🦆 🐦

Sandy's Scotch Broth

Sandy's Scotch Broth

Homemade Soup Day

A traditional hearty and warming farmhouse soup, Scotch Broth gained extra notoriety in the early phases of the Pop Art movement though American artist Andy Warhol’s Campbell’s Soup can series, highlighting mid-century modern classic canned soups of which Scotch Broth was a popular and recognizable flavour. Scotch Broth is featured in his second portfolio of soup can prints from 1968-69. Warhol rendered each label by hand, including all the lettering, aiming to mimic the everyday commercial item as closely as possible! Interesting, in 2016, thieves stole some of the soup can art prints from the Springfield Art Museum in Missouri where the set has resided since 1985. According to art insurers, 'Tomato Soup' is the most expensive and sought-after" with 'Chicken Noodle' is the second-most-desirable work. According to the FBI, the stolen prints include the prints of the beef, vegetable, tomato, onion, green pea, chicken noodle and black bean cans. Pepper pot, cream of mushroom and consommé (beef), were left behind. Fortunately, Scotch Broth was not in this set. Lamb, barley, and root vegetables .... ‘Mmm, mmm, good!’ Recipe included! 🍲

Haggis Hunters

Haggis Hunters

Haggis Hunting Season

It's Open Season for all Haggis Hunters! Whether you are an old hand at trapping this wily beast or this is your first attempt, remember that you have until Burns Night, January 25th to bag your haggis. Also note that although it is legal to catch and eat most types of haggis including the Hebridean Haggis and the Lewis Haggis, the "Shaggy Lowlands Haggis" and the "Urban Striped Haggis" are protected by law. If your sympathies lie with the poor beasties or if your diet requires a meatless option, there are now vegetarian, vegan, and gluten-free options for a mock-haggis! Also, for Californians, a recent law was passed now making it legal to eat road-kill haggis. What's your fancy?

Petticoat Tails

Petticoat Tails

Shortbread Day

Shortbread was an expensive luxury in times past and for ordinary people, usually reserved for special occasions such as weddings, Christmas and New Year celebrations. In Shetland it was traditional to break a decorated shortbread cake over the head of a new bride on the threshold of her new home! Although shortbread fingers and petticoat tails are the most common baking shapes, Walker's Shortbread, one of the most easily recognizable brands, sometimes creates special edition shapes, such as camels!

The Haggis Thrash

The Haggis Thrash

Burns Night

Suet, spices, onions, oatmeal and a sheep's pluck - heart, liver and lights - all boiled in a sheep's stomach, the haggis is a dish whose origins have been hotly disputed by food historians over the last decade. Regardless, this humble food is generally considered distinctly and de facto Scottish, no less for the regional ingredients than for the general reverence and good humour associated with this humblest of peasant foods. Similar but less celebrated variations include the Pölsa (Sweden), Hakkemat (Norway), Niania (Russia), and Chireta (Aragon). Tonight ends Haggis Hunting season, so if you've been lucky enough to bag one for tonight's toasts and feasting, approach and address your haggis boldly! It's "offaly" tasty! 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿

Atholl Brose

Atholl Brose

Liqueur Day

The brew is first recorded in 1475 during the campaign of the Earl of Atholl to capture Iain MacDonald, Lord of the Isles who was leading a rebellion against the king. Hearing that MacDonald drank from a small well, the Earl ordered it to be filled with honey, whisky and oatmeal. Allegedly, MacDonald stayed sampling the delicious concoction and was captured!

Archie's Clootie Dumpling

Archie's Clootie Dumpling

Figgy & Plum Pudding Day

A "Clootie/Cloutie Dumpling" is the Scottish version of a Christmas pudding. Firstly and most importantly, it is a pudding boiled in a "clout," a cloth. The tradition comes from the days before people had ovens and so cooked much of their food by boiling ingredients in huge pots. Although flour, suet, dried fruit and spices always feature, regional variations, like the addition of treacle, feature in Fife and other areas. And like all traditional puddings, clootie dumplings come with their own set of traditions. When it's being made everyone in the household should give it a good skelp – or smack – to make sure it has a nice round shape! Serve with custard. 🎄 🥮

Shortbread Fingers

Shortbread Fingers

Shortbread Day

Regardless of shape, some traditional Scottish variations on shortbread are Pitcaithly Bannock (made with almonds, caraway seeds, crystallized orange) and Yetholm Bannock (which includes chopped ginger)!

Bannocks and Brose

Bannocks and Brose

Pancake Day

Toss those pancakes, oatcakes, soda scones, drop scones, crumpets or bannocks, folks ... It's Pancake Day! Shrove Tuesday (Pancake Day or Pancake Tuesday) is known in Scotland as Bannock Night, and is a moveable feast day preceding Ash Wednesday (the first day of Lent), which is often celebrated by consuming pancakes and griddle cakes! Shrove Tuesday was the last opportunity to use up eggs and fats before embarking on the Lenten fast, and pancakes or bannocks were the perfect way of using up these ingredients. The Scots version of Lenten bannocks, is made with oatmeal, eggs, milk or beef stock and cooked on a girdle (griddle). Milk-brose or gruel was often served to eat with the bannocks, leading to this evening also being referred to as Brose Day (Brosie), or Milk-Gruel Night! Some older customs on Bannock Night involve dritual pouring of batter - one person would pour the batter onto the griddle, another turned the pancake and a third removed them when they were ready, handing them round the assembled company. When the bowl of batter was almost empty, a small quantity of soot was aded to the mixture to make the large sooty bannock, also known as the dreaming bannock. The sooty bannock would fill the whole girdle and symbolic charms could be dropped into it: button (bachelor); a ring (married); thimble (old maid); farthing (widow); scrap of material (tailor); straw (farmer). Once the bannock was turned and cooked through, it was cut into bits and put into the baker's apron for everyone to draw a piece with their fortune. At the end of the evening, a piece of the sooty bannock would be put inside a sock and placed under pillows where the dreamer hoped to dream of their future partner! 🥞

Hielan Brochan

Hielan Brochan

World Porridge Day

Legend has it that when Samuel Johnson boasted to his friend James Boswell that in England “we wouldn’t think of eating oats. We only feed them to horses,” Boswell retorted “Well, maybe that’s why in England you have better horses, and in Scotland we have better men.”

Mrs. Lambert's Black Bun

Mrs. Lambert's Black Bun

Hogmanay

Originally enjoyed on Christmas and Twelfth Night, Black Bun is now consumed year round, but most traditionally on Hogmanay Night. The great Scottish folklorist F. Marian McNeill writes: “Black bun is the old Scottish Twelfth Night Cake which was transferred to Hogmanay after the banning of Christmas and its subsidiary festival, Uphalieday, or Twelfth Night, by the Reformers.” So, enjoy your fierce raisin devils and gay currant sprites with impunity - recipe included!

Traditional Sweets & Puddings & Porridges Index of Dances

(click for dance description or cribs)

Dance
Type
Couples
Devisor
Source
Link Note
Archie's Clootie Dumpling
Reel
4C
Marr
West Lothian 7th
Atholl Brose
Jig
3C/4C
Boehmer
Cameo 16
Atholl Brose
Jig
4C
Drewry
Canadian
Bannocks and Brose
Jig
3C/4C
Holden
Birmingham 20 SCD 2004
Bannocks o' Barley
Reel
3C/4C
Attwood
Alexander 2
Coming Soon
Blairgowrie Brose
Strathspey
2C/4C
Drewry
Summer Collection 2
Coming Soon
Bramble Jelly
Jig
3C/4C
Mackey
Eight by Thirty-Two [6]
Helen's Shortbread
Reel
3C
Otto
The Culver City Collection
Hielan Brochan
Reel
4C
Mitchell
Whetherly Book 14
Highland Heather Honey
Medley
square
Bill Forbes
Craigievar Bk 1
Land of the Golden Oatcake
Jig
4C
Boehmer
Cameo 18
Mrs. Lambert's Black Bun
Jig
3C/4C
-
null
Petticoat Tails
Jig
3C/4C
Attwood
Southgate
Coming Soon
Petticoat Tails
Reel
3C/4C
Boyd
Whetherly 9
Scots Marmalade
Reel
3C/4C
Boehmer
Cameo 16
Coming Soon
Scots Shortcake
Jig
4C
Boehmer
Cameo 16
Shortbread Fingers
Strathspey
3C
Knox
Double H

Traditional Savouries & Sides Index of Dances

(click for dance description or cribs)

Dance
Type
Couples
Devisor
Source
Link Note
Cauld Kail
Medley
3C/4C
RSCDS IX
null
Cock a leekie
Jig
3C/4C
Gilroy
Coming Soon
Cullen Skink
Strathspey
4C
Drewry
Welsh Set
Finnan Haddies
Strathspey
4C
Drewry
Bankhead 4
Hotch-Potch
Jig
3C/4C
Boehmer
Cameo 16
Coming Soon
Mince and Tatties
Strathspey
Dickson
Dunedin 5
null
Neaps an' Haggis
Reel
2C/4C
Drewry
Rondel
Oxtail Soup
Reel
4C
McMurtry
Devil's Quandary
Powsowdle
Reel
3C/4C
Boehmer
Cameo 16
Coming Soon
Rumbledethumps
Jig
4C
Gooch
Rose & Thistle
Sandy's Scotch Broth
Strathspey
3C
Gail Sibley
Katannuta Book
Scotch Broth
Reel
4C
Davison
Coming Soon
Scotch Broth
Reel
3C/4C
Ewington
Glasgow 90th Anniversary
null
Tatties & Neaps
Reel
4C
Rhodes
Snowdon 2
null
The Kale Pot
Strathspey
3C/4C
Boyd
SDA
null

Chieftain of the Pudding Race Index of Dances

(click for dance description or cribs)

Dance
Type
Couples
Devisor
Source
Link Note
Haggis on the Window
Strathspey
4C
Katzberg
75th Annivesary
Hoolie Haggis
Medley
2C/3C
Wheadon
-
Hunting The Haggis
Reel
3C/4C
Attwood
Alexander 10
Coming Soon
It's Raining Haggis!
Strathspey
3C
-
Werner: Scottish Flavour 1
Longhorn Haggis
Reel
3C/4C
Palmer
Lone Star
Coming Soon
Neaps An' Haggis
Reel
2C/4C
Drewry
Rondel Bk
The Haggis
Reel
3C/4C
Little
Carlingwork Book
The Haggis Hunt
Reel
4C
Barthel
-
Coming Soon
The Haggis Hunters
Medley
4C
Dix
Reel Friends 1
The Haggis Thrash
Reel
2C/4C
Drewry
Welsh Set
The Haggis Tree
Strathspey
2C/4C
Drewry
Autumn 83
The Sinister Haggis
Strathspey
3C/4C
Beattie
Charities 14
Coming Soon
To Catch a Haggis
Strathspey
-
Reeves
-
Coming Soon

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