Live Long and Prosper

Leonard Nimoy as Mr. Spock

Star Trek Day

Sep 8

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Today's Musings, History & Folklore

"SPOCK: Stonn. She is yours. After a time, you may find that having is not so pleasing a thing after all as wanting. It is not logical, but it is often true. Spock here. Stand by to beam up. Live long, T'Pau, and prosper. T'PAU: Live long and prosper, Spock. SPOCK: I shall do neither. I have killed my captain and my friend ... Energize." ~ Star Trek, Amok Time, 1967

Greet someone today with the phrase "Live Long and Prosper" or if you prefer "Dif-tor heh smusma" (which is the equivalent Vulcan). Be sure to accompany this greeting with the iconic Vulcan salute, a gesture and greeting devised by Leonard Nimoy for his character, Mr. Spock on the original TV series of Star Trek. The White House referenced the salute in its statement on Leonard Nimoy's death in 2015, calling it "the universal sign for 'Live long and prosper'". The following day, NASA astronaut Terry W. Virts posted a photo on his Twitter feed from the International Space Station showing the hand gesture (with the Earth in the background) as the ISS passed over Nimoy's birthplace of Boston, Massachusetts, United States. More recently, in 2016, Dr. Philippa Whitford, the Scottish National Party's MP, spoke in the House of Commons supporting the establishment of Britain's first spaceport to be in Scotland. She concluded with the salute and the words "Live long and prosper." 🖖

Live Long and Prosper

"Live Long and Prosper" or if you prefer "Dif-tor heh smusma" (which is the equivalent Vulcan) is the phrase often employed by Science and First Officer, Mr. Spock of the USS Enterprise.  This greeting is usually accompanied by the iconic Vulcan salute, a gesture and greeting devised by Leonard Nimoy for his character, Mr. Spock on the original TV series of Star Trek.

In his autobiography I Am Not Spock, Nimoy wrote that he based it on the Priestly Blessing performed by Jewish Kohanim with both hands, thumb to thumb in this same position, representing the Hebrew letter Shin (ש), which has three upward strokes similar to the position of the thumb and fingers in the salute. The letter Shin here stands for El Shaddai, meaning "Almighty (God)", as well as for Shekinah and Shalom.

 

The White House referenced the salute in its statement on Leonard Nimoy's death, calling it "the universal sign for 'Live long and prosper'".  The following day, NASA astronaut Terry W. Virts posted a photo on his Twitter feed from the International Space Station showing the hand gesture (with the Earth in the background) as the ISS passed over Nimoy's birthplace of Boston, Massachusetts, United States.

There is even an emoji for the Vulcan Salute.  Click the graphic for a copy and to see it and all its variations. 

Live long and strathspey on!

Live Long and Prosper
Live Long and Prosper

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Scottish Country Dancing Dictionary or the

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