The Scottish Snowman

Snowman Day

Jan 18

Other Scottish Country Dances for this Day

Snowman Day
The Scottish Snowman
Show More

Today's Musings, History & Folklore

"Snowmen fall from heaven, unassembled." ~Traditional

Residents of Bethel, Maine, USA, and surrounding towns, built a snow woman measuring 37.21 m (122 ft 1 in) tall, over a period of one month in 2008. 13 million pounds of snow were used to build Olympia the snow woman. She was only a few feet shorter than the Statue of Liberty and was decorated with 5 foot wreaths for eyes, 16 skis for eyelashes, tires for buttons, and a 130 foot scarf! Olympia the snow woman holds the current record for the world's biggest snowperson.

The Scottish Snowman

In the calm before snowstorms if it is winter in your hemisphere, it's a good day to build a snowman for World Snowman Day!  World Snowman Day is celebrated every year on January 18. This particular date was chosen because a figure ‘8’ looks just like the shape of a traditional snowman.

As every child knows, snow must be just the right temperature for snow ball rolling and building, not dry, but just above melting!

 

World Snowman Day was started Started in 2010 by Cornelius Graetz – a German with the world’s biggest collection of model snowmen!

Regionally, there are snowman building technique variations.  In North America, snowmen are generally built with three spheres representing the head, torso, and lower body.   In the United Kingdom, two spheres are used, one sphere representing the body and one representing the head. The usual practice is to then decorate and optionally dress the snowman with sticks for arms, stones or coal for eyes, and a carrot for a nose!

In hotter desert climes, you can even build a snowman out of sagebrush or tumbleweeds!

For a video of the charming children's animated film, The Snowman (1982) which includes a dance with a Scottish kilted snowman, click below.

The Scottish Snowman
The Scottish Snowman

Jan    Feb    Mar    Apr    May    Jun    Jul    Aug    Sep    Oct    Nov    Dec

The majority of dance descriptions referenced on this site have been taken from the

 

Scottish Country Dancing Dictionary or the

Scottish Country Dancing Database 

 

Snapshots of dance descriptions are provided as an overview only.  As updates may have occurred, please click the dance description to be forwarded to a printable dance description or one of the official reference sources.

Follow us on social media

  • Facebook - Grey Circle
  • Twitter - Grey Circle

© 2019 Curious Magpie Designs