Sirius

Antique representation of the constellation of Canis Major with Sirius, the Dog Star

The Dog Days of Summer

Aug 2

Other Scottish Country Dances for this Day

The Dog Days of Summer
Sirius
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Today's Musings, History & Folklore

"The dog days are over The dog days are done!" ~Florence and the Machine, "Dog Days Are Over"

The ancient Greeks observed that the appearance of the Dig Star, Sirius, heralded the hot and dry summer, and feared that it caused plants to wilt, men to weaken, and women to become aroused!  Anyone suffering its effects was said to be "astroboletos"  or "star-struck". 

Sirius

Today marks the end of the Dog Days of summer, a sultry part of the summer, occurring during the period that Sirius, the Dog Star, rises at the same time as the sun.   Now often reckoned from July 3 to August 11,  the Dog Days have come to mean a period marked by lethargy, inactivity, or indolence.

Sirius is a multiple star system and the brightest star in the Earth's night sky.  With a visual apparent magnitude of −1.46, it is almost twice as bright as Canopus, the next brightest star. The name "Sirius" is derived from the Ancient Greek  (Seirios), meaning "glowing" or "scorcher". 

Also known colloquially as the "Dog Star", reflecting its prominence in its constellationCanis Major, the rising of Sirius marked the flooding of the Nile in Ancient Egypt and the "dog days" of summer for the ancient Greeks, while to the Polynesians in the Southern Hemisphere,  the star marked winter and was an important reference for their navigation around the Pacific Ocean.

The ancient Greeks observed that the appearance of Sirius heralded the hot and dry summer, and feared that it caused plants to wilt, men to weaken, and women to become aroused!  Due to its brightness, Sirius was noted to twinkle more in the unsettled weather conditions of early summer. To Greek observers, this signified possible emanations with a malignant influence. Anyone suffering its effects was said to be "astroboletos"  or "star-struck". 

Because of its association with the constellation of  Orion, as the Hunter's dog, the Ancient Greeks thought that Sirius's emanations could also affect dogs adversely, making them behave abnormally during the "dog days," the hottest days of the summer.  The excessive panting of dogs in hot weather was thought to place them at risk of desiccation and disease.  

Homer, in the Iliad, references the association of "Orion's dog" (Sirius) with oncoming heat, fevers and evil, in describing the approach of Achilles toward Troy:

Sirius rises late in the dark, liquid sky
On summer nights, star of stars,
Orion's Dog they call it, brightest
Of all, but an evil portent, bringing heat
And fevers to suffering humanity.

For more on the many cultural and symbolic associations of the rising of the Dog Star, click the constellations, showing Orion the hunter and his dogs.

Sirius
Sirius

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The majority of dance descriptions referenced on this site have been taken from the

 

Scottish Country Dancing Dictionary or the

Scottish Country Dancing Database 

 

Snapshots of dance descriptions are provided as an overview only.  As updates may have occurred, please click the dance description to be forwarded to a printable dance description or one of the official reference sources.

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