Apple Wine and Georgia Peaches

Peach Pie Day

Aug 24

Other Scottish Country Dances for this Day

Peach Pie Day
Apple Wine and Georgia Peaches
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Today's Musings, History & Folklore

"Peachy keen!"

For three centuries English-speakers have been using "peach" and "peachy" to describe things that they considered really good, desirable and attractive, including attractive young ladies. The soft protective peach fuzz which inhibits insects and rot marks the only significant difference between peaches and their close cousin the nectarine and is a is a result of a single gene variant. 🍑🍑🍑

Apple Wine and Georgia Peaches

Peaches, mixed with sugars, cinnamon and a few other special ingredients inside a buttery, flaky crust - Peach Pie!  Yum!


Franciscan monks introduced peaches to St. Simons and Cumberland Island, barrier islands off the coast of what is now Georgia in the 16th century.  Cherokee Indians grew peaches there as well during the18th century.


Peach production exploded after the Civil War when Georgia farmers were looking for alternatives to cotton. They were so successful that in the following decades Georgia earned the nickname “the Peach State.” increased railroad lines and the refrigerated boxcar meant faster shipment to markets and pushed peach production to 8 million bushels a year by 1928. 

For three centuries English-speakers have been using "peach" and "peachy" to describe things that they considered really good, desirable and attractive, including attractive young ladies. 

According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the American phrase "peaches and cream," is used to describe life or some desirable and pleasant state of affairs, or the lovely complexion of a fair maiden.  In the last fifty years or so the answer to the question "How are things going?" with the response, "Peachy keen," has altered from a positive meaning to a hint of a sarcastic innuendo.

For an award-winning peach pie recipe, click the vintage peach crate label, one of many fruit packing companies with Scottish roots.

Apple Wine and Georgia Peaches
Apple Wine and Georgia Peaches

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The majority of dance descriptions referenced on this site have been taken from the

 

Scottish Country Dancing Dictionary or the

Scottish Country Dancing Database 

 

Snapshots of dance descriptions are provided as an overview only.  As updates may have occurred, please click the dance description to be forwarded to a printable dance description or one of the official reference sources.

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